Couchbase Cluster using Docker Compose

Couchbase 4.0 provides lots of features that allows you to develop with agility and operate at any scale. Some of the features that allow you to operate at any scale are:

  • Elastic Scalability
  • Consistent High Performance
  • Always-On Availability
  • Multi-Data Center Deployment
  • Simple and Powerful Administration
  • Enterprise-grade Security

Learn more about these enterprise features at couchbase.com/operate-at-any-scale.

A complete overview is available in Couchbase Server 4.0 datasheet.

This blog will explain how you can easily setup a 3-node Couchbase Cluster using Docker Compose.

Docker Couchbase Cluster

The source code and latest instructions are available at github.com/arun-gupta/docker-images/tree/master/couchbase-cluster.

Create Couchbase Nodes

Couchbase cluster can be easily created using the following Docker Compose file:

This file has service definition for three Couchbase nodes. Admin ports are exposed for only one node as other nodes will talk to each other use Docker-internally assigned IP addresses.

  1. Create three directories ~couchbase/node1, ~couchbase/node2, ~couchbase/node3 – one for each node.
  2. Start three Couchbase nodes as using the docker-compose.yml shown earlier:
    This command is given on a Docker Machine.
  3. Check status of the nodes:
    Docker Compose can also show the status:
  4. Check logs of the nodes:

Configure Couchbase Cluster

Lets configure these nodes to be part of a cluster now.

  1. Find IP address of the Docker Machine:
  2. Access Couchbase Admin Console at http://<DOCKER_MACHINE_IP:8091. This is http://192.168.99.104:8091 in our case. It will show the output as:

    Docker Couchbase Cluster Setup

    Click on “Setup”.

  3. Each container is given an internal IP address by Docker, and each of these IPs is visible to all other containers running on the same host. We need to use these internal IP address when adding a new node to the cluster.Find IP address of the first container:

    Use this IP address to change the Hostname field:

    Docker Couchbase Cluster Node 1

  4. Click on “Next”. Adjust the RAM if necessary. Read more about Couchbase Cluster Settings.
  5. Pick a sample bucket that you’d like to get installed, and click on Next.
  6. Change Per Node RAM Quota from 400 to 100. This is required as we’ll add other nodes later.Docker Couchbase Cluster Per Node RAM Quota
  7. Click on Next, accept T&C, and click on Next.
  8. Enter a password that you can remember as we’ll need this later to add more nodes.

Default view of the cluster looks like as shown:

Docker Couchbase Cluster Default View

Add More Couchbase Nodes

Now, lets add the other two nodes that were created earlier by Docker Compose.

  1. Click on “Server Nodes” to see the default view as:

    Docker Couchbase Cluster Server Nodes Default View

  2. Find IP address of one of the remaining nodes:

  3. Click on “Add Server”, specify the IP address:

    Docker Couchbase Cluster Add Server Node1
    and click on “Add Server”.

  4. Repeat the previous two steps with the server name couchbasecluster_couchbase2_1.

Couchbase Cluster Rebalance

A cluster needs to be rebalanced to ensured that the data is well distributed amongst the newly added or removed nodes. Read more about Couchbase Cluster Rebalance.

Clicking on “Pending Rebalance” tab shows the nodes that have been added to the cluster but are not rebalanced yet:

Docker Couchbase Cluster Pending Rebalance

Click on “Rebalance” and this will automatically rebalance the cluster:

Docker Couchbase Cluster Rebalanced

You just deployed a Couchbase cluster using Docker Compose, enjoy!

Some more references:

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5 thoughts on “Couchbase Cluster using Docker Compose

  1. Have you tried connecting CBQ (in /Users/arungupta/tools/Couchbase Server.app/Contents/Resources/couchbase-core/bin) as:

    bin > ./cbq –engine=http://192.168.99.118:8093
    Couchbase query shell connected to http://192.168.99.118:8093/ . Type Ctrl-D to exit.
    cbq>

    and then issuing your commands?

  2. Thanks for this awesome tutorial!

    Thought I read it’s best to join a node to a cluster by a resolvable name vs ip just in case the node ip changes for whatever reason. Any thoughts on this?

  3. Tim,

    Have been working on an updated tutorial that will show how Docker Compose can be used to scale services and automatically join the cluster. Do you want to help?

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