Deployment Pipeline for Java EE 7 with WildFly, Arquillian, Jenkins, and OpenShift (Tech Tip #56)

Tech Tip #54 showed how to Arquillianate (Arquillianize ?) an existing Java EE project and run those tests in remote mode where WildFly is running on a known host and port. Tech Tip #55 showed how to run those tests when WildFly is running in OpenShift. Both of these tips used Maven profiles to separate the appropriate Arquillian dependencies in “pom.xml” and <container> configuration in “arquillian.xml” to define where WildFy is running and how to connect to it.

This tip will show how to configure Jenkins in OpenShift and invoke these tests from Jenkins. This will create deployment pipeline for Java EE.

Lets see it in action first!

Configuration required to connect from Jenkins on OpenShift to a WildFly instance on OpenShift is similar to that required for  connecting from local machine to WildFly on OpenShift. This configuration is specified in “arquillian.xml” and we can specify some parameters which can then be defined in Jenkins.

On a high level, here is what we’ll do:

  • Use the code created in Tech Tip #54 and #55 and add configuration for Arquillian/Jenkins/OpenShift
  • Enable Jenkins
  • Create a new WildFly Test instance
  • Configure Jenkins to run tests on the Test instance
  • Push the application to Production only if tests pass on Test instance

Lets get started!

  1. Remove the existing boilerplate source code, only the src directory, from the WildFly git repo created in Tech Tip #55.
  2. Set a new remote to javaee7-continuous-delivery repository:
  3. Pull the code from new remote:

    This will bring all the source code, include our REST endpoints, web pages, tests, updated “pom.xml” and “arquillian.xml”. The updated “pom.xml” has two new profiles.

    Few points to observe here:

    1. “openshift” profile is used when building an application on OpenShift. This is where the application’s WAR file is created and deployed to WildFly.
    2. A new profile “jenkins-openshift” is added that will be used by the Jenkins instance (to be enabled shortly) in OpenShift to run tests.
    3. “arquillian-openshift” dependency is the same as used in Tech Tip #55 and allows to run Arquillian tests on a WildFly instance on OpenShift.
    4. This profile refers to “jenkins-openshift” container configuration that will be defined in “arquillian.xml”.

    Updated “src/test/resources/arquillian.xml” has the following container:

    This container configuration is similar to the one that was added in Tech Tip #55. The only difference here is that the domain name, application name, and the SSH user name are parametrized. The value of these properties is defined in the configuration of Jenkins instance and allows to run the test against a separate test node.

  4. Two more things need to be done before changes can be pushed to the remote repository. First is to create a WildFly Test instance which can be used to run the tests. This can be easily done as shown:

    Note the domain here is milestogo, application name is mywildflytest, and SSH user name is 546e3743ecb8d49ca9000014. These will be passed to Arquillian for running the tests.

  5. Second is to enable and configure Jenkins.In your OpenShift Console, pick the “mywildfly” application and click on “Enable Jenkins” link as shown below:techtip56-enable-jenkinsRemember this is not your Test instance because all the source code lives on the instance created earlier.Provide the appropriate name, e.g. in my case, and click on “Add Jenkins” button. This will provision a Jenkins instance, if not already there and also configure the project with a script to build and deploy the application. Note down the name and password credentials.
  6. Use the credentials to login to your Jenkins instance.Select the appropriate build, “mywildfly-build” in this case. Scroll down to the “Build” section and add the following script right after “# Run tests here” in the Execute Shell:

    Click on “Save” to save the configuration. This will allow to run the Arquillian tests on the Test instance. If the tests pass then the app is deployed. If the tests fail, then none of the steps after that step are executed and so the app is not deployed.

  7. Lets push the changes to remote repo now:

    The number of dots indicate the wait for a particular task and will most likely vary for different runs.  And Jenkins console ( shows the output as:

    Log files for Jenkins can be viewed as shown:

    This shows the application was successfully deployed at and looks like as shown:


Now change “src/main/webapp/index.jsp” to show a different heading. And change  “src/test/java/org/javaee7/sample/” to make one of the tests fail. Doing “git commit” and “git push” shows the following results on command line:

The key statement to note is that deployment is halted after the tests are failing. And you can verify this by revisiting and check that the updated “index.jsp” is not visible.

In short, tests pass, website is updated. And tests fail, the website is not updated. So you’ve built a simple deployment pipeline for Java EE 7 using WildFly, OpenShift, Arquillian, and Jenkins!

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