Tag Archives: jboss

JBoss EAP 7 and NoSQL using Java EE and Docker

JBoss EAP 7 Beta is now released, many congratulations to Red Hat and particularly to the WildFly team!

There are plenty of improvements coming in this release as documented in Release Notes. One of the major themes is Java EE 7 compliance.

JBoss EAP 7 and Java EE 7

IBM and Oracle already provide commercially supported Java EE 7-compliant Application Servers. And now Red Hat will be joining this party soon as well. Although WildFly has supported Java EE 7 for 2+ years but commercial support is a critical for open source to be adopted enterprise-wide. So this is good news!

You can learn all about different Java EE 7 APIs in the DZone Refcardz that I authored along with @alrubinger.

Java EE 7 Refcardz

There are plenty of “hello world” Java EE 7 Samples that should all run with JBoss EAP. Hopefully somebody will update the pom.xml and add a new profile.

Why NoSQL?

If you are building a traditional enterprise application then you might be fine using an RDBMS. There are plenty of advantages of using RDBMS but using a NoSQL database instead has a few advantages:

  • No need to have a pre-defined schema and that makes them a schema-less database. Addition of new properties to existing objects is easy and does not require ALTER TABLE. The unstructured data gives flexibility to change the format of data any time without downtime or reduced service levels. Also there are no joins happening on the server because there is no structure and thus no relation between them.
  • Scalability, agility and performance is more important than the entire set of functionality typically provided by an RDBMS. This set of databases provide eventual consistency and/or transactions restricted to single items but more focus on CRUD.
  • NoSQL are designed to scale-out (horizontal) instead of scale-up (vertical). This is important knowing that databases, and everything else as well, is moving into the cloud. RBDMS can scale-out using sharding but requires complex management and not for the faint of heart. Queries requiring JOINs across shards is extremely inefficient.
  • RDBMS have impedance mismatch between the database structure and the domain classes. An Object Relational Mapping, such as one provided by Java Persistence API or Hibernate is needed in such case.
  • NoSQL databases are designed for less management and simpler data models lead to lower administration cost as well.

So you are all excited about NoSQL now and want to learn more:

In short, there are four different types of NoSQL databases:

  • Document: Couchbase, Mongo, and others
  • Key/Value: Couchbase, Redis, and others
  • Graph: Neo4J, OrientDB, and others
  • Column: Cassandra and others

Java EE 7 provides Java Persistence API that does not provide any support for NoSQL. So how do you get started with NoSQL with JBoss EAP 7?

This blog will show how to query a Couchbase database using simple Java EE application deployed on JBoss EAP 7 Beta.

What is Couchbase?

Couchbase is an open-source, NoSQL, document database. It allows to access, index, and query JSON documents while taking advantage of integrated distributed caching for high performance data access.

Developers can write applications to Couchbase using different languages (Java, Go, .NET, Node, PHP, Python, C) multiple SDKs. This blog will show how you can easily create a CRUD application using Java SDK for Couchbase.

Run JBoss EAP 7

There are two ways to start JBoss EAP 7.

Download and Run

  • Download JBoss EAP 7 Beta and unzip.
  • Start the application server as:

Docker Run

In a containerized world, you just docker run to run your JBoss EAP. However, JBoss EAP image does not exist on Docker Hub and so the image needs to be explicitly built. You still need to explicitly download JBoss EAP and then use the following Dockerfile to build the image:

The image is built as:

And then you can run the JBoss EAP 7 container as:

Notice, how application and management ports are bound to all network interfaces. This will simplify to deploy the application to this JBoss EAP instance later.

Stop the server as we will show an easier way to start it later.

Start Application Server and Database

The Java EE application will provide a HTTP CRUD interface over JSON documents stored in Couchbase. The application itself will be deployed on JBoss EAP 7 Beta. So it would require to start Couchbase and JBoss EAP.

Use the Docker Compose file from github.com/arun-gupta/docker-images/blob/master/jboss-eap7-nosql/docker-compose.yml to start Couchbase and JBoss EAP 7 container:

The application is started as:

The started containers can be seen as:

Configure Couchbase Server

Clone couchbase-javaee application. This Java EE application uses Couchbase Java SDK APIs to connect to the Couchbase server. The bootstrap code is:

and is invoked from Database abstraction.

Couchbase Server can be configured using REST API. These REST APIs are defined in a Maven profile in pom.xml of this application. And so configure Couchbase server as:

Deploy Java EE Application to JBoss

Java EE Application can be easily deployed to JBoss EAP 7 Beta using the WildFly Maven Plugin. This is also defined as a Maven profile in pom.xml as well.

Deploy the application as:

Access the Application

As mentioned earlier, the application provides HTTP CRUD API over JSON documents stored in Couchbase.

Access the application as:

CRUD operations (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE) can be performed on Airline resource in the application. Complete CRUD API is documented at github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-javaee.

This blog explained how to access a NoSQL database from JBoss EAP 7.

Read more about Couchbase 4:

Learn more about Couchbase in this recent developer-focused webinar:

JBoss EAP gives 509% ROI over closed source application servers

new study by IDC shows how Red Hat JBoss EAP customers are significantly benefitting over closed source commercial application servers:

JBoss EAP IDC 2015

The study says that a common paradigm with JBoss EAP customers three years ago …

There was uncertainty about whether JBoss EAP would scale as well as more expensive options and whether JBoss EAP was as feature rich, particularly for high-end projects. Those concerns prevented IT operations from going all in on a single software standard. Despite that, customers were pleased with the benefits they were able to achieve from their use of JBoss EAP, and customers were able to achieve an impressive return on investment by adopting this approach.

Sounds familiar?
Does your company still think like that?
Do the closed source vendors still give you that pitch?

The study shares how customers’ perspectives have changed over these years …

Today, we’ve found that JBoss EAP customers are more systematic in their use of JBoss EAP or OpenShift by Red Hat as the standard application server or cloud application platform within a standardized environment. Customers are no longer worried that JBoss EAP is not as sophisticated as more expensive alternatives and now believe it’s at performance parity with its competitors.

There are much more fundamental benefits for developing in open source:

One customer said that because JBoss EAP comes from open source, it is built from a lot of good ideas from the community and the internal design is architected to make it simpler to use than non-community-based alternatives.

That’s why we love Community Powered Innovation!

The cost benefit cannot be over emphasized anyway:

the cost benefit associated with JBoss EAP gave them an affordable opportunity to standardize, whereas they would have been too cost challenged using other options.

And the customers are saying:

We did a cost-benefit analysis. Many of our applications need a development platform for multiple environments … and if we compare JBoss EAP with other solutions … it’s a no-brainer. Night and day

Are customers using it for only new projects? Or migrating their existing mission critical projects to JBoss EAP as well?

Three years ago …

Then it was enough to begin using JBoss EAP for new projects.

And now …

we’ve found that customers made the decision to migrate production applications to the new environment in order to gain speed and compliance benefits from standardizing application operations and change management.

Register and download the report now!

What are you waiting for?

Download JBoss EAP (Java EE 6 compliant) and get full commercial support or WildFly 10 Beta1 to try Java EE 7 and lots of other cool features!

DevNation and Red Hat Summit 2015 Wrapup

RedHat Summit Logo DevNation Logo

Red Hat Summit and DevNation is a wrap!

It took two full night sleep and a long afternoon nap to fully recover from the excitement, stimulation, and exhaustion that sets in after meeting awesome developers, customers, partners, colleagues, and geeks from around the world. The fact that I gave four talks, one hands-on lab, participated in two panels, ran Devoxx4Kids event, talked to a lots of analysts, book signing, breakfasts/lunches/dinners/receptions, ran every morning by Charles river – all within 6 days added to the exhaustion as well 😉

In the end, it was very rewarding and inspiring to see the work others are doing!

Complete set of slides are available at redhat.com/summit/2015/presentations. Here are links to the slides from my sessions:

Watch the middleware keynote by Craig Muzilla:

Watch Burr Sutter geek show starting at ~19:00.

Learn/understand more about our middleware offerings using Accelerate, Integrate, and Automate.

Some pictures from the event …

 
 
   
   
 

Complete album …

Here are some other photo albums:

Enjoy!

 

Microservices with JBoss EAP 6 Reference Architecture

Microservices follow the divide-and-conquer methodology for technology and teams to create a software that is easier to develop, understand and maintain. The overall quality of the software is much higher because of the CI/CD practices that are an imperative part of using such an architecture.

A new paper is released by the Red Hat Reference Architecture Team titled “Microservice Architecture: Building Microservices with JBoss EAP 6“.

The purpose of the reference architecture is explained in the summary section:

This reference architecture recites the basic tenets of a microservice architecture and analyzes some of the advantages and disadvantages of this approach. This paper expressly discourages a one size fits all mentality, instead envisioning various levels of modularity for services and deployment units.

Microservice Reference Architecture

The reference architecture also provides a sample application that shows how to build a microservice application using JBoss Developer Studio and JBoss EAP 6:

The sample application provided with this reference architecture demonstrates Business Driven Microservices. The design and development of this system is reviewed at length and the steps to create the environment are documented.

Are you building and deploying microservices using JBoss EAP 6? Share your thoughts with us!

Previously published reference architecture documents are available at red.ht/1uFlHpw.

Provide feedback at refarch-feedback@redhat.com.

JBoss EAP 6.4 – Java 8, JSR 356 WebSocket, Kereberos auth for management

JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6.4, an update to the commercial release of Red Hat’s Java EE 6 compliant application server is now available.

JBoss EAP Logo

Download JBoss EAP 6.4

For current customers with active subscriptions, the binaries can be downloaded from the Customer Support Portal. This also has Installer, Quickstarts, Javadocs, Maven repository, Source Code, and much more.

Bits are also available from jboss.org/products/eap under development terms & conditions; and questions can be posed to the EAP Forum.

New Features in JBoss EAP 6.4

The key new features are:

  • Java 8 Support
  • JSR 356 WebSockets 1.0 support
  • Kerberos auth for management API connections, EJB invocations, and selected database access
  • Hibernate Search included as a new feature
  • Support for nested expressions
  • Ability to read boot errors from the management APIs
  • Display of server logs in the admin console

Read the comprehensive list of new features in JBoss EAP 6.4.

Documentation

Complete documentation is available at Customer Support Portal, and here are quick links:

If you are looking for a Java EE 7 compliant application server, then download WildFly.

Announcing JBoss Champions

JBoss Champion

JBoss Champions is a selected group of community members who are passionate advocate of JBoss technologies under a program sponsored by Red Hat. It fosters the growth of individuals that promote adoption of JBoss Projects and/or JBoss Products and actively share their deep technical expertise about it in the community, within their company and their customers or partners. This could be done in forums, blogs, screencasts, tweets, conferences, social media, whitepapers, articles, books, and other means.

Founding JBoss Champions

Proud and excited to announce the first set of JBoss Champions:

  1. Adam Bien (@AdamBien)
  2. Alexis Hassler (@alexishassler)
  3. Antonin Stefanutti (@astefanut)
  4. Antonio Goncalves (@agoncal)
  5. Bartosz Majsak (@majson)
  6. Francesco Marchioni (@mastertheboss)
  7. Geert Schuring (@geertshuring)
  8. Guillaume Scheibel (@g_scheibel)
  9. Jaikiran Pai
  10. John Ament (@JohnAment)
  11. Mariano Nicolas De Maio (@marianbuenosayr)
  12. Paris Apostolopoulos (@javapapo)

Many congratulations to the first set of JBoss Champions! Make sure to wish them using email, tweet, blog, or any other means that is available on their jboss.org profile. Give them a hug when you meet them at a conference. Ask them a tough JBoss question, challenge them! Invite them to your local Java User Group to give a talk about JBoss

Want to nominate a JBoss Champion?

Do you have it in you, and feel worthy of being a JBoss Champion?

Want to nominate yourself, or somebody else?

Send an email to champions@jboss.org.

Here are some likely candidates:

  • Senior developers, architects, consultants, academia who are using and promoting JBoss technologies using different means
    • Blogs and webinars
    • Publish articles on jboss.org, InfoQ, DZone, etc.
    • Social media
    • Talks at conferences and local JUGs/JBUGs
  • Implemented real-world projects using JBoss technologies
  • Actively answering questions in JBoss forums/StackOverflow
  • Authored a book on JBoss topic
  • Lead a JBoss User Group
  • Mentoring other community members and grooming champions

Make sure the nominee has a current jboss.org profile and has all the relevant details. Include any references that will highlight your value to the JBoss community. The complete list of criteria is clearly defined at jboss.org/champions.

Subscribe to the twitter feed of existing JBoss Champions.

Once again, many congratulations to the first set of JBoss Champions, and looking forward to many others. Submit your nomination today!

Data as a Service: JBoss Data Virtualization and Hadoop powering your Big Data solutions

Guest blog by Syed Rasheed (@Junooni).

Red Hat and Cloudera, announce the formation of a strategic alliance. From JBoss perspective, the key objective of the alliance is to leverage big data enterprise-wide and not let Hadoop become another data silo. Cloudera combined with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization integrates Hadoop with existing information sources including data warehouses, SQL and NoSQL databases, enterprise and cloud applications, and flat and XML files. The solution creates business-friendly, reusable and virtual data models with unified views by combining and transforming data from multiple sources including Hadoop. This creates integrated data available on-demand for external applications through standard SQL and web services interfaces.

The reality at vast majority of organization is that data is spread across too many applications and systems. Most organizations don’t know what they’ve lost because their data is fragmented across the organization. This problem does not go away just because an organization is using big data technology like Hadoop; in fact, they get more complicated. Some organizations try to solve this problem by hard coding the access to data stores. This simple approach inefficiently breaks down silos and brings lock-in with it. Lock-in makes applications less portable, a key metric for future proofing IT. This approach also impedes organizational agility because hard coding data store access is time consuming and makes IT more complex, incurring technical debt. Successful business need to break down the data silos and make data accessible to all the applications and stakeholders (often a requirement for real time contextual services).

redhat-jboss-datavirt

A much better approach to solving this problem is abstraction through data virtualization. It is a powerful tool, well suited for the loose coupling approach prescribed by the Modern Enterprise Model. Data virtualization helps applications retrieve and manipulate data without needing to know technical details about each data store. When implemented, organizational data can be easily accessed using a simple REST API or via familiar SQL interface.

Data Virtualization (or an abstracted Data as a Service) plugs into the Modern Enterprise Platform as a higher-order layer, offering the following advantages:

  • Better business decisions due to organization wide accessibility of all data
  • Higher organizational agility
  • Loosely coupled services making future proofing easier
  • Lower cost

Data virtualization is therefore a critical part of the big data solution. It facilitates and improves the use of big data in the enterprise by:

  • Abstracting big data into relational-like views
  • Integration with existing enterprise sources
  • Adding real time query capabilities to big data
  • Providing full support for standard based interfaces like REST and OData in addition JDBC and ODBC.
  • Adding security and governance to the big data infrastructure
  • Flattening data siloes through a unified data layer.

Want to learn more, download, and get started with JBoss Data Virtualization visit http://www.jboss.org/products/datavirt

Data Virtualization by Example https://github.com/datavirtualizationbyexample

Interested in community version then visit http://teiid.jboss.org/

Load Balance WebSockets using Apache HTTPD (Tech Tip #48)

JBoss EAP 6.3 provides a technology preview of WebSocket and WildFly have supported them as part of Java EE 7 compliance.

github.com/javaee-samples/javaee7-samples/tree/master/websocket provide tons of Java EE 7 samples that run on WildFly. If you are interested in similar functionality on JBoss EAP 6.3 then github.com/jboss-developer/jboss-eap-quickstarts/tree/6.4.x-develop/websocket-hello is a quickstart. In addition, there are a few more samples at github.com/arun-gupta/jboss-samples/tree/master/eap63.

One of the common questions asked related to WebSockets is how to how to load balance  them. This Tech Tip will explain that for WildFly and JBoss EAP 6.3.

First, what are the main components ?

  • At least Apache HTTPD 2.4.5 is required. Now HTTPD binaries are not available for Mac but fortunately compiling instructions are explained clearly in Tech Tip #45.
  • mod_proxy_wstunnel is an Apache module that provides support for tunneling of Web Socket connections to a backend Web Sockets server, such as WildFly or JBoss EAP. It is a support module to mod_proxy that provide support for a number of popular protocols as well as several different load balancing algorithms. The connection is automagically upgraded to a WebSocket connection.  And all the modules are already included in the modules directory.
  • mod_proxy_balancer module is required that provides load balancing for HTTP and other protocols.

Let’s go!

  1. Download and unzip WildFly 8.1.
  2. Start WildFly 8.1 in domain mode using ./bin/domain.sh.
  3. Download this chat sample, rename the file to “chat.war” and deploy to “main-server-group” as:
    The only difference from the original Java EE 7 WebSocket Chat sample is the addition of System.getProperty("jboss.node.name") to display the name of WildFly instance serving the application. The source code is available at github.com/arun-gupta/wildfly-samples/tree/master/websocket-loadbalance.
  4. Uncomment the following lines in /usr/local/apache2/conf/httpd.conf:
    This will enable all the required modules.
  5. Add the following code fragment at the end of “httpd.conf”:
    Proxy is a container for proxied resources and is creating a load balancing group in this case using balancer directive. BalancerMember adds a member to this load balancing group.  ProxyPass is a standard directive that maps remote servers running on different ports into the space of the local server. In this case, WildFly is started in domain mode and so starts two instances on port 8080 and 8230. Both of these instances are mapped to localhost:80, which is where Apache HTTPD is running by default.

The deployed chat sample is now accessible at localhost:8080/chat (first instance in the managed domain), localhost:8230/chat (second WildFly instance in the managed domain), and localhost/chat (via Apache HTTPD).

Now even if you kill one of the WildFly instances, the other instance will continue to serve the client. Note, this only gives application availability as there is no session failover in this.

This was also verified on JBoss EAP 6.3 and there are a few differences:

  1. Use the sample from github.com/arun-gupta/jboss-samples/tree/master/eap63/websocket-chat instead.
  2. The generated archive name is different and so the command would look slightly different too:
  3. Configure “httpd.conf” as:

And that’s it!

Watch this live in action:

An important point to understand is that there is no concept of “sticky sessions” in WebSocket as, unlike HTTP, there is a direct and “permanent” connection between the client and the server in this case.

Enjoy!

JBoss Middleware: Accelerate, Integrate, Automate

RHJB_Middleware_Logotype_RGB-Gray_0213_cw_300

Ever wondered how to understand multiple Red Hat JBoss middleware offerings ?

Mike Piech (@mpiech), GM of JBoss Middleware Business Unit explains them in a succinct video:

Its structured in three buckets:

Accelerate – Building things faster

  • JBoss Enterprise Application Platform provides an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 6 certified and features powerful yet flexible management, improved performance and scalability, and many new features to maximize developer productivity.
  • Red Hat JBoss Web Server is the only enterprise-class web server solution you need for large-scale websites and lightweight web applications. It provides a more secure and a more stable environment of open source web software, like Apache and Tomcat.
  • Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio provides superior support for your entire development lifecycle. It includes a broad set of tooling capabilities and support for multiple programming models and frameworks, including Java™ Enterprise Edition 6, HTML5, and many other popular technologies. It provides developer choice in supporting multiple JVMs, productivity with Maven, and in testing with Arquillian. It is fully tested and certified to ensure that all its plug-ins, runtime components, and their dependencies are compatible with each other.
  • Red Hat JBoss Data Grid gives you a straightforward approach to overcoming data obstacles, providing the ability to quickly access accurate, real-time information, meet high uptime requirements, streamline interaction with complex and rigid data tiers, and handle unprecedented transaction volumes.
  • Red Hat JBoss Portal is a proven solution for building high-impact, self-service applications

Integrate – Pull the pieces together

  • Red Hat JBoss Fuse is a flexible, small-footprint enterprise service bus (ESB) that enables rapid integration across the extended enterprise. Integration everywhere – on-premise or in the cloud.
  • Red Hat JBoss A-MQ is a flexible, high-performance messaging platform that delivers information reliably, enabling real-time integration and the Internet of Things (IOT).
  • Red Hat JBoss Fuse Service Works is a platform that creates reusable, changeable, and flexible business services that hide the complexity of connecting to different applications in your enterprise. It sets the stage for faster and easier cloud applications, mobile applications, and business process development projects.
  • Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. JBoss Data Virtualization makes data spread across physically diverse systems—such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems—appear as a set of tables in a local database.

Automate – Automate significant parts of your business

  • Red Hat JBoss BRMS is a comprehensive platform for business rules management and complex event processing. Organizations can incorporate sophisticated decision logic into line-of-business applications and quickly update underlying business rules as market conditions change.
  • Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite is a comprehensive platform for business process management. It includes all the business rules and complex event processing (CEP) capabilities of Red Hat JBoss BRMS [business rules management system], along with advanced tools and runtime support for Business Process Model and Notation v2.0 (BPMN2)-compliant business processes.

And this is also shown in the following image:

accelerate-integrate-automate

Learn all about it at:

Adding Java EE 7 Batch Addon to JBoss Forge ? – Part 6 (Tech Tip #40)

This is the sixth part (part 1part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5) of a multi-part video series where Lincoln Baxter (@lincolnthree) and I are interactively building a Forge addon to add Java EE 7 Batch functionality.

Part 1 showed how to get started with creating an addon, add relevant POM dependencies, build and install the addon using Forge shell, add a new command batch-new-jobxml, and add --reader--processor--writer parameters to the newly added command.

Part 2 showed how to identify classes for each CLI parameter that already honor the contract required by the Batch specification.

Part 3 showed how parameters can be made required, created templates for reader, processor, and writer, validated the specified parameters.

Part 4 added a new test for the command and showed how Forge can be used in debug mode.

Part 5 fixed a bug reported by a community member and started work to make processor validation optional.

This part shows:

  • Upgrade from Forge 2.6.0 to 2.7.1
  • Fix the failing test
  • Reader, processor, and writer files are now templates instead of source files
  • Reader, processor, and writer are injected appropriately in test’s temp project

Enjoy!

As always, the evolving source code is available at github.com/javaee-samples/forge-addons. The debugging will continue in the next episode.

Shape the future of JBoss EAP and WildFly Web Console

Are you using WildFly ?

Any version of JBoss EAP ?

Would you like to help us define how the Web Console for future versions should look like ?

wildfly-8.1-admin-console

Help the Red Hat UX Design team shape the future of JBoss EAP and WildFly!

We are currently working to improve the usability and information architecture of the web-based admin console. By taking part in a short exercise you will help us better understand how users interpret the information and accomplish their goals.

You do not need to be an expert of the console to participate in this study. The activity shouldn’t take longer than 10 to 15 minutes to complete.

To start participating in the study, click on the link below and follow the instructions.

http://ows.io/tj/12t0qr48

I completed the study in about 12 mins and was happy that my clicking around helped shape the future of JBoss EAP and WildFly!

Just take a quick detour from your routine for 10-15 mins and take the study.

Thank you in advance for taking the time to complete the study.

Adding Java EE 7 Batch Addon to JBoss Forge ? – Part 5 (Tech Tip #38)

This is the fifth part (part 1part 2, part 3, part 4) of a multi-part video series where Lincoln Baxter (@lincolnthree) and I are interactively building a Forge addon to add Java EE 7 Batch functionality.

Part 1 showed how to get started with creating an addon, add relevant POM dependencies, build and install the addon using Forge shell, add a new command batch-new-jobxml, and add --reader--processor--writer parameters to the newly added command.

Part 2 showed how to identify classes for each CLI parameter that already honor the contract required by the Batch specification.

Part 3 showed how parameters can be made required, created templates for reader, processor, and writer, validated the specified parameters.

Part 4 added a new test for the command and showed how Forge can be used in debug mode.

This part shows:

  • Fix a bug reported by a community member
  • Started work another issue to make processor validation optional

Enjoy!

As always, the evolving source code is available at github.com/javaee-samples/forge-addons. The debugging will continue in the next episode.

JUDCon Boston 2014 and History/Future

judcon-boston-2014

JUDCon is JBoss User Developer Conference and an event where JBoss users, developers, and community members meet to talk about anything and everything on JBoss technologies.

JUDCon India concluded earlier this year and JUDCon Boston is coming later this month. However the two events differ in their format. The first one was like a normal conference with a 2 day event, multiple tracks, multiple talks on different JBoss technologies per tracks, each talk being given by a speaker. There were usual hands-on labs, networking, etc.

JUDCon Boston is different, its a one day only event and focuses only on mobile technologies. And instead of talks where the user is mostly in a listen-only mode or sometimes swiping-through-my-phone mode depending upon the talk/speaker/time, it will be a structured hackfest with some micro-presentations to provide the background. Participants will come with their laptops and be able to build a mobile application using JBoss technologies such as AeroGear, Apache Cordova, KeyCloak, and OpenShift.

And the price point is just unimaginable, just $20 for full day of geekgasm!

When ? Jun 28, 2014
Where ? Boston, MA
Register ? Eventbrite

Without giving away too much details, lets hear it from Andrew Rubinger who is driving JUDCon Boston 2014.

If you are interested in a particular topic, jump to the timeline as shown below:

00:20: Introduction
01:29: History of JUDCon
03:09: How DevNation was formed and how are they different
06:18: JUDCon Boston
07:44: Who are the speakers
09:25: Future plans
11:34: How much networking opportunities ?
13:32 Where do you register ?

Also read Mark Little’s blog for more details.

Register for JUDCon Boston here. Lets build an app together :-)

Adding Java EE 7 Batch Addon to JBoss Forge ? – Part 4 (Tech Tip #30)

This is the fourth part (part 1part 2, part 3) of a multi-part video series where Lincoln Baxter (@lincolnthree) and I are interactively building a Forge addon to add Java EE 7 Batch functionality.

Part 1 showed how to get started with creating an addon, add relevant POM dependencies, build and install the addon using Forge shell, add a new command batch-new-jobxml, and add --reader--processor--writer parameters to the newly added command.

Part 2 showed how to identify classes for each CLI parameter that already honor the contract required by the Batch specification.

Part 3 showed how parameters can be made required, created templates for reader, processor, and writer, validated the specified parameters.

This part shows:

  • Fixed the issues from part 3 and generates new JobXML when reader, processor, and writer are specified
  • Added a new test to test the command
  • How Forge can be used in debug mode to debug add ons

Enjoy!

As always, the evolving source code is available at github.com/javaee-samples/forge-addons. The test code debugging will continue in the next episode.

JBoss/WildFly: Top Java EE Application Server for 5 years in ZeroTurnaround Reports

Zero Turnaround (the company behind JRebel and other Java productivity tools) has released their fifth edition of Java Tools and Technologies Landscape. This report started in 2009 as the speed of Java application server restarts, and has evolved into a lot more comprehensive report over the past 5 years. Oliver White (@theotown) and rest of Rebel Labs have really invested a lot of effort in making it a comprehensive and an inclusive report.

Several Red Hat projects/products are being mentioned in this report ranging from JBoss/WildFly, Hibernate, Ceylon, JBoss Developer Studio/Eclipse, Arquillian, and others.

In all these years, JBoss has consistently stayed at the top amongst all the commercially supported application servers. 2009 report showed JBoss as the most widely used application server:

Another result from Java EE Container Redeploy & Restart Time report in 2010:

And from Java EE Productivity Report 2011:

And Developer Productivity Report from 2012:

And Great Java Application Server Debate in 2013 (amazingly results are same ;):

And now in 2014, once again:

84% of respondents are using Java EE 6 or Java EE 7.

If you need a Java EE 6 commercially supported application server, then get started with JBoss EAP. If you need a Java EE 7 compliant application server that will be commercially supported, get started with WildFly.

Download the complete report here!