Tag Archives: netbeans

Docker, Minecraft, Rx Java, CI/CD, Couchbase at JavaOne 2016

javaone2016-session-catalog

JavaOne 2016 Session Catalog is now live!

There are 400+ sessions from Sep 17 (Saturday) through Sep 22 (Thursday). Here are some of the places where you’ll find me:

Day/Date Time Title Co-speaker
Saturday, Sep 17 8am – 5pm JavaOne4Kids Several
Sunday, Sep 18 10:30am – 11:15am Dive into the Newest, Latest, and Cutting-Edgiest Technologies in the NetBeans IDE [UGF6434]  @mr__m
 Monday, Sep 19 8:30am – 10:30am Docker for Java Developers [TUT1887]  –
Monday, Sep 19 12:30pm – 1:30pm Docker Support in NetBeans, Eclipse, and IntelliJ [CON4236]  –
Monday, Sep 19 TBD O’Reilly Media Book Signing
Monday, Sep 19 5:30pm – 6:30pm Mobycraft: Manage Docker Containers by Using Minecraft [CON1931]  @aditya_g
Wednesday, Sep 21 1pm – 2pm Full-Stack Reactive Java Applications with Docker [CON3987]  @nraboy
Thursday, Sep 22 2:30pm – 3:30pm Building a Private CI/CD Pipeline with Java and Docker on Oracle Cloud [CON7609]  @jbaruch

And then there is “hallway track”, parties, Couchbase booth (#5002), O’Reilly Media book signing, Java Hub, and other places.

Where will I see you?

j1-125x125-i-like-this-3089434j1-125x125-im-attending-3089435j1-125x125-im-speaking-3089437j1-125x125-im-demoing-3089436j1-125x125-see-me-here-3089441j1-125x125-join-me-3089439j1-125x125-we-exhibiting-3089443  j1-125x125-register-now-3089440

Complete set of these images are available at JavaOne Speaker Toolkit.

Source: blog.couchbase.com/2016/july/docker-minecraft-rxjava-cicd-couchbase-javaone-2016

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 7 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 7of Coffee on Couchbase series where we are building a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

During this episode, two useful links about NetBeans platform were shared:

Here is what we’ve covered so far:

  • Part 1
    • GitHub repository for the plugin
    • Started a new NetBeans plugin – discussed Ant vs Maven approach for starting a plugin
    • Couchbase node configured in NetBeans
  • Part 2
    • Show NetBeans users how to install Couchbase and configure it with a sample bucket
    • Run a simple Java EE application that queries the documents stored in Couchbase sample bucket
    • Migrating the NetBeans plugin from Ant to Maven
    • Show a message in popup help menu
    • Double clicking on the Couchbase node connects to Couchbase server and displays a message in status window
  • Part 3
    • Login to Couchbase server
    • See Bucket list
    • See Documents in Bucket
    • Query data from buckets (basic queries, N1QL queries coming later)
    • Compare Documents (NetBeans Diff Viewer)
    • Open Documents (in JSON editor, not savable back to Couchbase)
    • Multiple Couchbase hosts can be configured
  • Part 4
    • Entry point of a NetBeans plugin
    • Learn about NetBeans platform node hierarchy
    • Property sheet for each node
    • Keeping code organized for the plugin
    • Creating menus for different nodes
  • Part 5
    • Showcase features that have been created in the plugin so far
    • Show different icons for indexed and non-indexed buckets in Couchbase
  • Part 6
    • Add a new menu “Create Primary Index” for non-indexed buckets
    • Started work on refreshing the name and description of a bucket after indexing
    • Started work on optimizing the number of documents retrieved for a bucket

The recording from part 7 is now available:

This episode covers:

  • Discussion around modal window vs status bar when creating bucket
  • Icons for newly created buckets are shown correctly as non-indexed
  • Change the menu name from “Set Primary Index” to “Create Primary Index”
  • Discussion around properties panel vs menu items design pattern
  • “Explore from here” for nodes and buckets
  • Default error handling (by NetBeans platform) while editing JSON document
  • Rename buckets (only in NetBeans view, not in database)
  • Discussion around REST endpoint code generator using a bucket
  • Displayed a dialog when JSON document is edited/saved

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

We’d love to see your tweets containing snapshots of your document in NetBeans. Use  #NetBeans #Couchbase to let us know :)

NetBeans Couchbase Part 7

Enjoy!

Source: http://blog.couchbase.com/2016/march/netbeans-plugin-couchbase-part7-coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 6 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 6 (part 5part 4part 3part 2part 1) of Coffee on Couchbase series where we are building a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 6 is now available:

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • Add a new menu “Create Primary Index” for non-indexed buckets
  • Started work on refreshing the name and description of a bucket after indexing
  • Started work on optimizing the number of documents retrieved for a bucket

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

You can use the NetBeans plugin module file (NBM) from episode 5.

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

We’d love to see your tweets containing snapshots of your document in NetBeans. Use  #NetBeans #Couchbase to let us know :)

Enjoy!

Source: http://blog.couchbase.com/2016/march/netbeans-plugin-couchbase-part6-coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 5 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 5 (part 4part 3part 2part 1) of Coffee on Couchbase series where we are building a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 5 is now available:

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • Showcase features that have been created in the plugin so far
  • Show different icons for indexed and non-indexed buckets in Couchbase

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

You can use the NetBeans plugin module file (NBM) from episode 5.

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

We’d love to see your tweets containing snapshots of your document in NetBeans. Use  #NetBeans #Couchbase to let us know :)

Here is mine:

NetBeans Couchbase Indexed Buckets

Enjoy!

Source: http://blog.couchbase.com/2016/march/netbeans-plugin-couchbase-part5-coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 4 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 4 (part 3part 2part 1) of Coffee on Couchbase series where we are building a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 4 is now available:

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • Entry point of a NetBeans plugin
  • Learn about NetBeans platform node hierarchy
  • Property sheet for each node
  • Keeping code organized for the plugin
  • Creating menus for different nodes

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

You can use the NetBeans plugin module file (NBM) from previous episode.

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

We’d love to see your tweets containing snapshots of your document in NetBeans. Use  #NetBeans #Couchbase to let us know :)

Enjoy!

Source: http://blog.couchbase.com/2016/march/netbeans-plugin-couchbase-part-4-coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 3 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 3 (part 2part 1) of Coffee on Couchbase series where we are building a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 3 is now available:

A lot of features have been added during this part. This episode shows the following features:

  1. Login to Couchbase server
  2. See Bucket list
  3. See Documents in Bucket
  4. Query data from buckets (basic queries, N1QL queries coming later)
  5. Compare Documents (NetBeans Diff Viewer)
  6. Open Documents (in JSON editor, not savable back to Couchbase)
  7. Multiple Couchbase hosts can be configured

The next episode will show how we built these features under the hood:

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

NetBeans plugin module file (NBM) is now available.

Here is a snapshot of the work in progress:

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 3

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

We’d love to see your tweets containing snapshots of your document in NetBeans. Use  #NetBeans #Couchbase to let us know :)

Enjoy!

Originally posted at: blog.couchbase.com/2016/netbeans-plugin-couchbase-part-3-coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Part 2 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

This is part 2 (part 1) of Coffee on Couchbase series where we will build a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 2 is now available:

Unfortunately, Geertjan’s voice is not correctly captured in this one!

Part 2 covers:

  1. Show NetBeans users how to install Couchbase and configure it with a sample bucket
  2. Run a simple Java EE application that queries the documents stored in Couchbase sample bucket
  3. Migrating the NetBeans plugin from Ant to Maven
  4. Show a message in popup help menu
  5. Double clicking on the Couchbase node connects to Couchbase server and displays a message in status window

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

For now, the plugin can be built and reloaded in a new or current instance of NetBeans. You’ll see:

NetBeans Couchbase Plugin Part 2

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

Enjoy!

NetBeans Plugin for Couchbase Plugin Part 1 – Coffee on Couchbase

coffee-on-couchbase

NetBeans simplified out-of-the-box experience is really nice and intuitive. That’s why it continues to be my favorite IDE!

This morning started a new Coffee on Couchbase webinar series. It will build a NetBeans plugin for Couchbase. This multi-part webinar series is going to be a discussion with Geertjan Wielenga (@GeertjanW, my esteemed friend and NetBeans PM) and Eben Haber (@ebenhaber, Couchbase Tooling Architect).

As part of this series, you’ll also learn how to build a NetBeans plugin from scratch and learn the awesomeness behind NetBeans platform.

The recording from part 1 is now available:

Part 1 covers:

  1. GitHub repository for the plugin
  2. Started a new NetBeans plugin – discussed Ant vs Maven approach for starting a plugin
  3. Couchbase node configured in NetBeans

All the code is evolving at: github.com/arun-gupta/couchbase-netbeans-plugin.

For now, the plugin can be built and reloaded in a new or current instance of NetBeans. You’ll see:

NetBeans Couchbase Plugin Part 1

NBMs will be released going further.

Let us know by filing bugs on features that you’d like to see in this plugin.

Enjoy!

WildFly 9 on NetBeans, Eclipse, IntelliJ, OpenShift, and Maven (Tech Tip #86)

wildfly9-banner

WildFly 9 CR1 was recently released. Lots of cool features are included:

And this is above the usual Java EE 7 compliance!

This blog is a quick check to verify that it works in all three major IDEs and OpenShift.

WildFly 9 and NetBeans

Lets start with NetBeans 8.0.x first. The screenshot shows WildFly 9 CR1 configured in NetBeans and started. The log is shown in the console.

WildFly 9 CR1 on NetBeans

Complete instructions to setup WildFly in NetBeans are in NetBeans 8 and WildFly 8.

WildFly 9 and Eclipse

Getting Started with JBoss Tools and WildFly 8 shows how to configure WildFly with JBoss Tools. Here are the series of snapshots that shows configuring WildFly 9 in JBoss Tools with Eclipse Mars M6.

A new experimental runtime …

WildFly 9 CR1 Experimental

Specify the directory …

WildFly 9 CR1 Eclipse New Runtime

Now WildFly 9 is configured as a Server in Eclipse …

WildFly 9 CR1 Eclipse Servers

And finally the server is up and running …

WildFly 9 CR1 Eclipse Console

Complete details, including download and update center coordinates, are explained at JBoss Tools Alpha 2 for Eclipse Mars.

WildFly 9 and IntelliJ

WildFly 8 and IntelliJ IDEA Screencast provide complete details on how to setup IntelliJ with WildFly. The snapshot below shows WildFly 9 configured in IntelliJ 14.1.2.

WildFly 9 CR1 with IntelliJ 14

WildFly 9 and OpenShift

Creating an OpenShift application is pretty straightforward as well:

This creates a new application and uses WildFly 9 as the underlying application server. Complete details about the OpenShift cartridge are at github.com/openshift-cartridges/openshift-wildfly-cartridge/tree/wildfly-9. You can find about how to create an OpenShift application with an existing application, how to connect to this WildFly instance using JBoss CLI.

WildFly 8 CR1 on OpenShift also provide more details.

WildFly 9 and Maven

WildFly Maven Plugin  provide the latest information about how to get started with WildFly Maven plugin.

But you just need to fire up a WildFly server as:

And then deploy the Java EE 7 Movieplex application as:

And the plugin definition is very simple:

Enjoy!

WildFly plugin integrated in NetBeans (Tech Tip #31)

WildFly tooling is available in JBoss Developer Studio (Eclipse), NetBeans, and IntelliJ. While JBoss Developer Studio and IntelliJ provided in-built support for WildFly, and an extra plugin had to be installed for NetBeans. Not a big deal but NetBeans is more known for a seamless out-of-the-box experience. Starting with today’s nightly, WildFly community is a step closer to that now!

This means if you download the latest NetBeans nightly, WildFly plugin is now integrated in NetBeans. You still need to download WildFly and configure it though.

netbeans-wildfly-techtip31

Tech Tip #18 shows screencasts on how to do Java EE 7 development with NetBeans.

Many thanks to Emmanuel Hugonet (@ehsavoie) for providing the plugin and NetBeans team for guiding through the process.

I’d like to have a NetBeans co-bundle with WildFly for a complete seamless experience. Would you ?

When you think of Java EE 7, think about WildFly. That is the only open source application server that will be commercially supported with JBoss EAP!

NetBeans 8 and WildFly 8 Screencasts (Tech Tip #18)

Wildfly_logo netbeans8-logo

Enjoy the short screencast on how to get started with WildFly 8 in NetBeans 8:

Emmanuel Hugonet (@ehsavoie) created the NetBeans plugin and maintains it. He also created a quick video that shows how to:

  • Configure and start WildFly 8 server
  • Run a Java EE 7 WebSocket sample on WildFly
  • Choose Maven profile to run tests
  • Type of resources shown by the plugin

Enjoy!

File the bugs here (use “WildFly” component).

Don’t forget a ton of Java EE 7 samples are available at github.com/javaee-samples/javaee7-samples.

WildFly 8, JDK 8, NetBeans 8, Java EE 7: Excellent combo for enterprise Java

JDK 8 and NetBeans 8 was released Mar 18, 2014
WildFly 8 was released Feb 11, 2014
Java EE 7 was released Jun 12, 2013

Past 12 months have been really instrumental for Java community with all these very important releases.

java8-logonetbeans8-logo  Wildfly_logo  javaee-logo

Together, JDK 8 + NetBeans 8 + Java EE 7 +WildFly 8 make an excellent combination for building enterprise Java application.

JDK 8, Java EE 7, and WildFly 8 are also supported in Eclipse and IntelliJ as well. So you are not limited to just NetBeans 😉

I tried Java EE 7 hands-on lab with this combination and every thing worked seamlessly. Now I just need a pull request (issue #12) where the source code is using java.util.stream and Lambdas. Who is going to do it ? 😉

There are tons of new features in JDK 8, the main ones are:

  • Lambda Expressions allows you to express instances of single-method classes more compactly. In other words, it allows you to treat functionality as method, or code as data. Read more details in Venkat‘s excellent book on Functional Programming with Java or standard Java tutorial.
  • Default methods enable you to add new functionality to an interface. This ensures binary compatibility with code written for older versions of those interfaces. This is different from abstract methods as they do not have a method implementation. Read more details here.
  • Repeating annotations allows an annotation to be repeated over a declaration or type use. This is useful if the same annotation needs to be applied multiple times to a class or a method. Read more details here.
  • Method parameter names are now available using Reflection API (Parameter.getName()).
  • Functional-style programming using the newly added Stream API in  java.util.stream package.
  • New tools: jjs to invoke Nashorn engine and jdeps for class dependency analyzer
  • New Nashorn JavaScript engine
  • New Date-Time API (JSR 310)
  • Replacement of permgen with Metaspace (JEP 122) – -XX:PermSize and -XX:MaxPermSize are replaced by -XX:MetaSpaceSize and -XX:MaxMetaspaceSize in java
  • Compact profiles

And there are a lot more!

WildFly 8 is Java EE 7 compliant, and in addition also provide tons of features:

  • High performance web server (Undertow)
  • Role Based Access Control (RBAC)
  • Port reduction
  • “Core” distribution

Read the complete list here.

Remember that Java EE 7 mandates JDK 7 only, and so even though you can leverage all the runtime improvements made in the Java SE 8 platform but in order to have your application run on a Java EE 7 compliant application server, you may be restricted to JDK 7 only. For example, GlassFish 4 is not even tested on JDK 8. WildFly 8 has been running its test suite on JDK 8 regularly. We may even leverage some of the JDK 8 features in the near future.

No matter what, JDK 8 + WildFly 8 + NetBeans 8 + Java EE 7 together make a very compelling toolset for your enterprise Java. If your applications don’t work, then file a bug on WildFly JIRA.

NetBeans 8 and WildFly 8 (Tech Tip #6)

Announcing the availability of WildFly support in NetBeans 8 nightly builds!

Wildfly_logo

netbeans-dev-techtip6

Disclaimer: WildFly plugin provides very basic functionality as of now and is evolving rapidly to support broader feature set. It is purely for testing purpose at this time.

Many thanks to Emmanuel Hugonnet for contributing the plugin and constant support from NetBeans team, especially Geertjan Wielenga in making this possible.

How to get started ?

  1. Download NetBeans 8 nightly. Worked on existing NetBeans 7.4 as well, see instructions below.
  2. Go to “Tools”, “Plugins”, “Available Plugins”, search on “wildfly” to see the updated screen:wildfly-plugin--netbeans-techtip6click on “Install”. Follow the prompts to complete the installation.
  3. In NetBeans, go to “Services”, right click on “Servers”, select “Add Server…” to see:wildfly-server-configure-techtip6Click on “Next>”.
  4. Install or build WildFly following Tech Tip #1. Click on “Browse…” next to “Server Location…” and select the location of WildFly. For example, I used “/Users/arungupta/workspaces/wildfly/build/target/wildfly-8.0.0.Beta2-SNAPSHOT” on my machine.wildfly-server-instance-techtip6

    Click on “Next>”.
  5. Take the defaults as shown:wildfly-instance-props-techtip6and click on “Finish”. Now you can see WildFly configured in NetBeans:

    wildfly-server-techtip6

  6. Right-click on the newly added server and select “Start”:wildfly-start-techtip6to see an output something like:

    “09:51:29,191 INFO [org.jboss.as] (Controller Boot Thread) JBAS015874: WildFly 8.0.0.Beta2-SNAPSHOT “WildFly” started in 2039ms – Started 184 of 232 services (78 services are lazy, passive or on-demand)”

    in the output console.

That’s all it takes to configure WildFly 8 in NetBeans 8!

Trying to run a simple sample showed the following window:

netbeans-server-one-time-techtip6

I particularly like this feature as it does not “corrupt” my Maven files or generate any IDE-specific files.

Do you want to try running Java EE 7 samples/tests and hands-on lab on WildFly from NetBeans ? File plugin bugs at NetBeans Bugzilla and use “WildFly” component.

Note, although this plugin can be installed in NetBeans 8 out-of-the-box, but you can configure an additional Update Center in earlier versions of NetBeans and use “http://deadlock.netbeans.org/job/nbms-and-javadoc/lastStableBuild/artifact/nbbuild/nbms/updates.xml.gz” URL. This is how I hacked my NetBeans 7.4 installation and added support for WildFly there.

Get your wheels churning and try your WildFly applications running from NetBeans 8.