Tag Archives: windows

Docker Remote API on Windows and OSX

There are multiple ways to monitor Docker containers.

  • Docker CLI provides the docker container stats API that gives basic information about the running containers.
  • Docker Remote API provides more detailed information about the containers.
  • Starting with Docker 1.13, there is an experimental feature with a Prometheus endpoint
  • cAdvisor is an open source tool that provides last container usage and performance characteristics. This data can be stored in a time series database, such as InfluxDB. This data can then be shown in a fancy graph using a Kibana dashboard.

These options were covered in detail in an earlier blog.

There are other commercial options like Docker EE, Sysdig, Datadog, New Relic, App Dynamics and others. If you are running containers on AWS, then CloudWatch can provide integrated monitoring.

OSX is my primary development platform. But recently, I needed a way to monitor Docker containers using the Remote API (aka REST API) on a Windows machine. The output of the REST API is exactly same independent of the operating system. But the way to access the Docker REST API using curl is different on an OSX and a Windows machine. This blog will explain how to exactly access this API on these two operating systems.

Check out 1.27 swagger specification to learn more about the capabilities of the REST API. A nicer and a more readable version of the API can be seen using Swagger UI. This is broken until #32649 is fixed.

Complete details about how the REST API corresponds to different Docker versions is explained in Docker REST API Versioning.

We’ll dig into this a bit later but first let’s take a look on how this API can be accessed.

Docker Remote API on OSX

On OSX, curl connects using a Unix domain socket as shown:

A WildFly container can be started as:

Stats can then be obtained using the command:

This will start printing stats as:

These stats are refreshed every second.

Any other REST API can be invoked very easily with this. This is simple and straight forward.

Install Docker on Windows

Docker installation on Windows depends on the flavor of your operating system.

Are you using Windows 10+ Pro 64-bit, then use Docker for Windows.

If using any older version of Windows, then you need to use Docker Toolbox.

Are you installing Windows in a virtual machine? Then Virtual Box cannot be used to create the VM. This is because Virtual Box does not support nested virtualization. This is required as Docker Toolbox uses Virtual Box to create and start Docker Machine. VMWare Fusion seems to work fine here though.

Now that you know that VMWare Fusion needs to be used, make sure you enable nested virtualization before starting the virtual machine.

Many thanks to Stefan Scherer (@stefscherer) for helping me understand the Windows configuration details.

Let’s see how the Docker REST API can now be invoked.

Docker Remote API on Windows 7/8

This section shows how to invoke the REST API using curl on Windows 7/8.

The REST API can be invoked using curl as shown:

First of all, the REST API, /containers/<name-or-id>/stats, is exactly the same. The way this API can be invoked is a bit different.

There are four differences: The first three parameters specify security credentials for the Docker Machine generated by Docker Toolbox on your Windows box:

  • <CERT> is the SSL certificate for Docker Machine
  • <CA_CERT> is the Certificate Authority certificate for the Docker Machine
  • <KEY> is the key generated for the Docker Machine

The values of these configuration parameters is those generated by docker-machine CLI.

The last change is that the protocol is changed from http to https.

Here is the exact command that worked on Windows 7 VM:

This invocation will print the exact same stats output on Windows 7 VM.

Now that you know how to use this API on OSX and Windows, you can also this API to do everything that Docker CLI. This is because the Docker CLI is just a convenient wrapper over the REST API. So a docker container run command is invoking the appropriate REST API on the Docker Host.

Docker Remote API on Windows 10

If you are using Windows 10, then use Docker for Windows. After that, you need to figure out which curl command to be used. There are couple of options:

  • Use Bash shell on Windows. It has curl command that works like Unix command that we all know pretty well. In this case, the REST API can be invoked as:
    Docker for Windows listens on port 2375 on Windows.
  • If you are Powershell user, then install curl command as:
    Now the command to invoke the REST API is:
    Note, there is a curl alias in Powershell and that is an alias for Invoke-WebRequest. So make sure to use curl.exe to invoke the REST API as this is the command installed using Chocolatey.

This blog provided different options of how to invoke the Docker Remote API using curl on Windows and OSX.


Docker on Windows 2016 Server

This blog is the first part of a multi-part series. The first part showed how to set up Windows Server 2016 as a VirtualBox VM. This second part will show how to configure Docker on Windows 2016 VM.

  1. Start an elevated PowerShell session:docker-windows-2016-22
  2. Run the script to install Docker:
    This will install the PowerShell module, enable containers feature and install Docker.


    The VM needs to be restarted in order for the containers to be enabled. Refer to Container Host Deployment – Windows Server for more detailed instructions.

  3. The VM reboots. Start a PowerShell and check Docker version using docker version command:docker-windows-2016-24More details about Docker can be found using the docker info command:docker-windows-2016-25
  4. Run your first Docker container using the docker run -it -p 80:80 microsoft/iis command:docker-windows-2016-26This will download the Microsoft IIS server Docker image. This is going to take a while so please be patient!
  5. Once the 8.9 GB image is downloaded (after a while), the IIS server is started for you. Check the list of images using the docker images command and the list of running containers using the docker ps command:docker-windows-2016-27More details about the container can be found using the docker inspect command:

  6. The exact IP address of the container can be found using the command:

    IIS main page is accessible at http://<container-ip>, as shown below:


The next part will show how to create your own Docker image on Windows Server 2016.

Source: blog.couchbase.com/2016/october/docker-on-windows-2016-server

Windows Server 2016 Using VirtualBox – Getting Ready for Docker

Windows  Server 2016 was announced a few weeks ago.  Download Windows 2016 Server Evaluation version. This blog is the first part of a multi-part series. The first part will show how to set up Windows Server 2016 as a VirtualBox VM. This is an update to Windows Server 2016 using VirtualBox for Docker Containers.

  1. Download Windows 2016 Server Evaluation version.  Its ~5GB download so try on a reliable and fast Internet connection.
  2. Create a new VM using Virtual Box:


  3. Set up a dynamically allocated HDD, make sure to choose 30GB (as shown):

    The installed operating system is ~17GB. The base windowsservercore image is 3.8GB. So if you chose the default 20GB HDD, then no Docker containers can run on it.

  4. Point to the downloaded ISO:


  5. Start the VM, take default settings:


  6. Click on Next:


    Click on Install now.

  7. Select the Desktop Experience version otherwise the standard Windows desktop will not be available after Windows is booted:

    Click on Next.

  8. Accept the license terms:


  9. Select Custom Install as we are installing as a VM:


  10. Take the default for the allocated space:


  11. Click on Next to start the installation:


    Wait for a few minutes for the installation to complete:


    It will take a few minutes for the install to complete.

  12. Enter the administrator’s password:


    Seems like it requires alphabets, numbers and special characters. The dialog expects to meet the password criteria without showing the criteria, this is weird!

  13. Entering the credentials shows the Windows login screen:


  14. In a classical Windows, you do a three-finger salute of Ctrl+Alt+Del to view Desktop. This key combination needs to be sent to Windows VM using  Virtual Box menu:


  15. Server Manager Dashboard shows up:


  16. Latest updates need to be installed. Click on the Start icon, and search for update:

    docker-windows-2016-17Select Check for Updates.

  17. Update window looks like:

    docker-windows-2016-18Select Check for updates again.

  18. Latest updates are downloaded and installed:


  19. Once the updates are downloaded and installed, then the VM needs to be restarted:

    docker-windows-2016-20Click on Restart now to restart the VM.

  20. Restarted VM looks like as shown:



This shows that Windows Server 2016 VM is now ready. Subsequent parts of this multi-part blog will show how to configure Docker containers and run a multi-container application using Docker Compose.

Source: blog.couchbase.com/2016/october/windows-server-2016-using-virtualbox-getting-ready-docker